இவற்றிற்கான களஞ்சியம் 'US' வகை

Oct 24 2006

[The News Tribune] Man accused of having relations with dog

Published by under Bad Remark,The News Tribune,US

Prosecutors say a man’s wife caught him having sex with their dog. He might be the first in the state charged under a new animal cruelty law.

KAREN HUCKS; The News Tribune
Published: October 20th, 2006 01:00 AM

A Spanaway man is the first person in Pierce County – and possible the first in the state – charged under a new section of the state’s animal cruelty law that makes bestiality a felony.

Pierce County prosecutors say Michael Patrick McPhail, 26, had sex with his family’s dog Wednesday.

Deputy prosecutor Karen Watson charged the father of two Thursday with one count of first-degree animal cruelty – a crime that could mean up to a year in jail if he’s convicted.

McPhail was arraigned Thursday afternoon in Pierce County Superior Court and a not-guilty plea was entered on his behalf.

Judge Katherine Stolz ordered him held in the Pierce County Jail in lieu of $20,000 bail.

Stolz set trial for Dec. 11.

According to a Pierce County Sheriff’s Department report, McPhail’s wife told investigators that she caught her husband on the back porch about 9:30 p.m. Wednesday having intercourse with their 4-year-old female pit bull terrier.

She took photos of the act, the report says.

The bestiality law, which took effect in June, was prompted by a case near Enumclaw in which a man died after having sex with a horse.

Before the law was enacted, Washington was one of 14 states where bestiality had not been explicitly prohibited.

Source:

Man could be charged under cruelty law

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Oct 23 2006

[Boston Globe] Washington should suggest Tamil self-government

SRI LANKA’S intermittent war between successive governments and the secessionist movement known as the Tamil Tigers has been going on for nearly a quarter century and has taken 65,000 lives. It is one of the most vicious and intractable conflicts in theworld, but receives less attention than other wars that involve American interests more directly.

Episodes of gruesome bloodletting on both sides this fall demonstrate that a 2002 ceasefire survives only on paper. At the same time, Pakistani arms deliveries to the government and a consequent expectation that India will provide military aid (albeit covert) to the Tamils threatens to transform Sri Lanka’s civil war into a proxy war between South Asia’s two principal antagonists. So the Bush administration did well last week to dispatch Richard Boucher, assistant secretary for South and Central Asian affairs, to Sri Lanka to press for a political solution to the island’s civil war.

During a visit last June, Boucher staked out a sound principle for resolution of the conflict. The United States believes, he said, that the Tamil ethnic minority that predominates in the north and east of the island nation ought to have some form of self-rule in its own homeland. Vague as this formula may be, it does point the way to a political rather than a military solution in Sri Lanka, including a durable, peaceful coexistence between the mostly Hindu Tamils and the Buddhist Sinhalese majority.

But for Boucher’s visit Thursday and Friday to have a practical effect, it will have to be followed up with concrete measures. Although American officials are prohibited from engaging in contacts with the Tamil Tigers because the group is on the US terrorism list, the Bush administration should give whole hearted backing to the Sri Lankan government’s participation in peace talks with the Tigers later this month in Geneva.

To demonstrate Washington’s seriousness about a permanent peace that provides for Tamil self-government and human rights in a confederal Sri Lanka, the administration ought to prevail on the central government to withdraw its armed forces from the Tamil areas in the north of the island. The Sri Lankan government should also be told that as a humanitarian gesture , it would be wise to open the road to Jaffna, the sole main artery connecting the Tamil areas to the rest of the country.

Peace in Sri Lanka must be accompanied by justice for the island’s Tamil minority. That justice and that peace should be seen as building blocks for the security in Asia that is sure to become more and more important to the United States.

Source:

Asia’s unending war

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Sep 29 2006

U.S. parents outsourcing kids’ homework to India

Published by under India,US

BOSTON (Reuters) – Private tutors are a luxury many American families cannot afford, costing anywhere between $25 to $100 an hour. But California mother Denise Robison found one online for $2.50 an hour — in India.

“It’s made the biggest difference. My daughter is literally at the top of every single one of her classes and she has never done that before,” said Robison, a single mother from Modesto.

Her 13-year-old daughter, Taylor, is one of 1,100 Americans enrolled in Bangalore-based TutorVista, which launched U.S. services last November with a staff of 150 “e-tutors” mostly in India with a fee of $100 a month for unlimited hours.

Taylor took two-hour sessions each day for five days a week in math and English — a cost that tallies to $2.50 an hour, a fraction of the $40 an hour charged by U.S.-based online tutors such as market leader Tutor.com that draw on North American teachers, or the usual $100 an hour for face-to-face sessions.

“I like to tell people I did private tutoring every day for the cost of a fast-food meal or a Starbucks’ coffee,” Robison said. “We did our own form of summer school all summer.”

The outsourcing trend that fueled a boom in Asian call centers staffed by educated, low-paid workers manning phones around the clock for U.S. banks and other industries is moving fast into an area at the heart of U.S. culture: education.

It comes at a difficult time for the U.S. education system: only two-thirds of teenagers graduate from high school, a proportion that slides to 50 percent for black Americans and Hispanics, according to government statistics.

China and India, meanwhile, are producing the world’s largest number of science and engineering graduates — at least five times as many as in the United States, where the number has fallen since the early 1980s.

Parents using schools like Taylor’s say they are doing whatever they can to give children an edge that can lead to better marks, better colleges and a better future, even if it comes with an Indian accent about 9,000 miles away.

SLANG & AMERICAN ACCENTS

“We’ve changed the paradigm of tutoring,” said Krishnan Ganesh, founder and chairman of TutorVista, which offers subjects ranging from grammar to geometry for children as young as 6 years old to adults in college.

“It’s not that the U.S. education system is not good. It’s just that it’s impossible to give personalized education at an affordable cost unless you use technology, unless you use the Internet and unless you can use lower-cost job centers like India,” he said over a crackly Internet-phone line from Bangalore. “We can deliver that.”

Many of the tutors have masters degrees in their subjects, said Ganesh. On average, they have taught for 10 years. Each undergoes 60 hours of training, including lessons on how to speak in a U.S. accent and how to decipher American slang.

They are schooled on U.S. history and state curricula, and work in mini-call centers or from their homes across India. One operates out of Hong Kong, teaching the Chinese language.

As with other Indian e-tutoring firms such as Growing Stars Inc., students log on to TutorVista’s Web site and are assigned lessons by tutors who communicate using voice-over-Internet technology and an instant messaging window. They share a simulated whiteboard on their computers.

Denise Robison said Taylor had trouble understanding her tutor’s accent at first. “Now that she is used to it, it doesn’t bother her at all,” she said.

TutorVista launched a British service in August and Ganesh said he plans to expand into China in December to tap demand for English lessons from China’s booming middle class. In 2007, he plans to launch Spanish-language lessons and build on Chinese and French lessons already offered.

A New Delhi tutoring company, Educomp Solutions Ltd., estimates the U.S. tutoring market at $8 billion and growing. Online companies, both from the United States and India, are looking to tap millions of dollars available to firms under the U.S. No Child Left Behind Act for remedial tutoring.

Teachers unions hope to stop that from happening.

“Tutoring providers must keep in frequent touch with not only parents but classroom teachers and we believe there is greater difficulty in an offshore tutor doing that,” said Nancy Van Meter, a director at the American Federation of Teachers.

But No Child Left Behind, a signature Bush administration policy, encourages competition among tutoring agencies and leaves the door open for offshore tutors, said Diane Stark Rentner of the Center on Education Policy in Washington.

“The big test is whether the kids are actually learning. Until you answer that, I don’t know if you can pass judgment on whether this is a good or bad way to go,” she said.

U.S. parents outsourcing kids’ homework help

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Sep 26 2006

Akila Ganapathy is appointed Business Operations prime for Global Manufacturing Services at Nortel

Published by under tamils,US

Global Manufacturing Services – Business Operations

We are pleased to announce Akila Ganapathy is appointed Business Operations prime for Global Manufacturing Services effective September 25. Akila will be based in RTP and report to me as a member of my senior cabinet.

In this role, Akila will be instrumental in maximizing the efficiency of our organization and ensuring collaboration and coordination among our functional teams and with the other business stakeholders. She will work closely with my executive team, HR and Finance to ensure organizational priorities are effectively aligned and addressed, and facilitate issues management and closure of critical business decisions. In addition, Akila will help all of us drive Own It! throughout our organization plus she will lead other key work essential for our operation transformation.

Akila joined Nortel in 1999 and has held a variety of roles in engineering, program management, and marketing. Most recently she drove cost leadership in Supply Chain Operations as Supply Chain Cost Manager. Prior to joining Nortel, Akila provided consulting, software development, and customer support team management with Wipro Systems in Bangalore, India.

She has a Master’s degree in Business Administration from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and a Bachelor’s degree in Engineering (Electronics & Communication) from Coimbatore Institute of Technology in India.

Please join me in welcoming Akila to our team.

Don McKenna
Global Manufacturing Services

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